Dating norms in france

08-Jul-2019 08:09 by 6 Comments

Dating norms in france - fired event rowupdating which

It is indeed complicated to explain the ambiguous, complicated and often opaque process by which French men and women pair off.“It just kind of happens”In the words of 36-year-old Laurence Bagot, a French journalist who spent a year at Harvard and admits she is as mystified by American dating habits as the Americans are by the French ones: “In France, getting together just kind of happens.” In a nutshell, everyone kind of seems to think that getting together in France just kind of happens! And the funny thing is that even when people are together, you rarely know what their relationship is.

My friends and I have met many French men through Tinder, and thus have learned a few things about the dating culture as a result: If a Frenchman wants you, you’ll know it.It's not a 'tie down' or a concept that you are automatically exclusive with a person.In the States we discuss serious relationships after quite a few dates; kissing, affection or hugging are normal in dating..When saying goodbye, it’s a formal custom to shake hands again.In an office, everyone shakes hands with everyone else on arrival at work and when they depart.While living in France, either on exchange or temporary stay, one might come across the possibility of dating a French person.

I recently came across this issue from a good friend of mine, exasperated about a few dates she went on and confused about the body language.

A few of mine include nighttime walks in the rain along the Seine, being kissed on a bridge with the Eiffel Tower behind us, riding around the city on the back of a scooter, and strolling hand in hand on the love lock bridge.

Even if it seems like they’re not feeling it, it’s definitely possible that you’ll still end up having the romantic French encounter you’ve always (not-so-secretly) wanted.

It’s also customary to say good day or good evening ( bonsoir) on entering a small shop and goodbye ( au revoir madame/monsieur) on leaving.

Bonjour becomes bonsoir around 18.00 or after dark, although if you choose bonsoir (or bonjour), don’t be surprised if the response isn’t the same.

Bonne nuit (good night) is used when going to bed or leaving a house in the evening.